SAORI loom, some assembly required (but very little!)

I’ve been considering purchasing a SAORI loom since I took a free workshop at a local public library with Chiaki O’Brien of StudioFUN this past June. (A narrative of that is here.) Yes, I bead. Yes, I took up sewing again about two or three years ago. I also work outside the home. I had never woven on a floor loom before this workshop (an inkle loom as a teenager), but I kept revisiting how much I enjoyed this experience, so I took money I had saved for years, and bought the loom from Chiaki.

The loom comes directly from Japan. I took pictures while unboxing my SAORI loom almost exactly two days ago after a late dinner – but the post is today, because I wanted to start weaving immediately! Also, I worked today. The photos are most of the story…

Big box! I’m grateful it’s doubly boxed, as the outer box was soggy in the corner. The inner box is perfect. (Also, I’m still decorated for Christmas, say hi to my light switch Santa.)

Inside is the main loom frame, and the rest of the working parts are inside the box strapped to the loom’s leg.

The instructions for unboxing and assembly are very detailed, including how to open it.

Inner box. In addition to the rest of the loom, I ordered “the book,” and some additional bobbins.

The rest of the loom components, laid out as in the assembly guide, for easy reference.

First part to install, the bobbin winder.

Now, hang the warp set. That’s the rope pulley system just barely in view at the top center of the picture, holding the heddles. It’s really appealing that this comes warped. I bought a serger a little over a year ago, and it came threaded; the same result of almost immediate satisfaction.

Now set up the warp roller at the back of the loom.

The latch and gear system for this works really well. I’m holding the latch up with the heddle hook so you can see the mechanism.

This is the warp control pedal. I will be revisiting this later…

Now setting up the reed.

Tying the warp threads on the tying rod.

All tied!

Hook up the pedals.

Add the built-in shelf.

Look at the “check if everything is set up properly” pictures. I pass inspection with two of them, but I have improperly wound the cable on the warp control pedal. Fixed.

And here is the loom, ready to weave!

It’s late at night by the time I finished, and I started weaving the next morning; I had the day off. I’ll show some in-progress pictures soon. Here’s one of the reasons I wanted this particular loom:

This loom folds quite compactly – but it has a 23″ weaving width, and the ability for about a 15′ warp. I do have a creative workspace, a small former bedroom, but it doesn’t have floor space for a permanent resident loom. I can fold this and put it away in closet, and transport it if desired. It really is an elegant design, and I’m looking forward to future weaving exploration.

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